Katholieke Stichting Medische Ethiek
20 september 2021

Paus over ongeboren leven: ‘Abortus is nooit het antwoord’

Katholiek Nieuwsblad,
28 mei 2019

 “Abortus is nooit het antwoord”
dat stellen moeten krijgen van wie een ongeboren kind een ernstige ziekte of
beperking blijkt te hebben.

Dat zei paus Franciscus afgelopen zaterdag. “Het menselijk leven is heilig en onschendbaar en het gebruik van prenatale diagnostiek voor selectieve doelen moet sterk worden ontmoedigd omdat het een uitdrukking is van een inhumane eugenetische mentaliteit, die families de mogelijkheid ontneemt om hun zwakste kinderen te verwelkomen, omhelzen en liefhebben.”

Abortusstandpunt Kerk

Franciscus sprak deelnemers toe aan een Vaticaanse bijeenkomst over
medische zorg voor “extreem kwetsbare” baby’s en de pastorale zorg voor hun
ouders. De totale afwijzing van abortus door de katholieke Kerk is niet primair
een religieuze positie, maar een menselijke, aldus de paus.

‘Elimineer nooit een menselijk leven’

“Slechts twee zinnen, twee vragen, kunnen ons helpen dit te begrijpen.
Eerste vraag: is het toegestaan een menselijk leven te elimineren om een
probleem op te lossen? Tweede vraag: is het toegestaan een huurmoordenaar in te
huren om een probleem op te lossen?”

“Nee”, vervolgde Franciscus, “het is niet toegestaan. Elimineer nooit een
menselijk leven, noch huur een huurmoordenaar in om een probleem op te lossen.”

Bij een prenatale diagnose van een ernstige ziekte of beperking, hebben
de ouders het nodig dat medisch personeel en werkers in het pastoraat hun nabij
zijn en steunen, aldus de paus.

Ieder kind is een gave

Hoewel sommigen de situatie van de baby als “onverenigbaar met het leven”
kunnen omschrijven, betekent volgens Franciscus het feit dat er beweging is en
dat de moeder weet dat zij zwanger is, dat er leven is. De ervaring daarvan van
de moeder moet gerespecteerd worden.

Ieder kind dat in de schoot van een moeder ontvangen wordt “is een gave die het verhaal van een familie, een moeder en vader, grootouders en broers en zussen zal veranderen. En deze baby moet worden verwelkomd, liefgehad en verzorgd.”

Overgenomen met toestemming van Katholiek Nieuwsblad.


Over het ongeboren leven: geen mens is ongeschikt voor het leven

Address of His Holiness Pope Francis to participants in the conference  “Yes to Life! – taking care of the precious gift of life in its frailty” organized by the Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life

Pope Francis
25 May 2019

Your Eminences, Dear Brother Bishops and Priests, Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Good morning and welcome. I greet Cardinal Farrell and I thank him for his words of introduction. My greeting also goes to all taking part in this international Conference, “Yes to Life! Taking Care of the Precious Gift of Life in its Frailty”, organized by the Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life, and by the Foundation Il Cuore in una Goccia, one of the groups that work daily in our world to welcome children born in conditions of extreme frailty. These are children that the throw-away culture sometimes describes as being “unfit for life”, and thus condemned to death.

No human being can ever be unfit for life, whether due to age, state of health or quality of existence. Every child who appears in a woman’s womb is a gift that changes a family’s history, the life of fathers and mothers, grandparents and of brothers and sisters. That child needs to be welcomed, loved and nurtured. Always! Even when they are crying, like that baby over there… (applause). Some people might think: “But, the baby is crying… they should leave”. No, this is music that all of us need to hear. (I think the baby heard that applause and thought it was for him!) We need to hear the sound always, even when the baby is a little annoying: Also in church: let children cry in church! They are praising God. Never, never chase a child out because he or she is crying. Thank you for your witness.

When a woman discovers that she is expecting a child, she immediately feels within her a deep sense of
mystery. A woman who becomes a mother knows this. She is aware of a presence growing within her, one that pervades her whole being. Now she is not only a woman but also a mother. From the very beginning, an intense, interactive dialogue takes place between her and the child. Scientists call this “cross-talk”. It is a real and intense relationship between two human beings communicating with one another from the very first moments of conception, and it leads to a mutual adjustment as the child grows and develops. This ability to communicate is not only on the part of the woman; even more, the child, as an individual, finds ways to communicate his or her presence and needs to the mother. Thus, this new human being immediately becomes a son or daughter, and this moves the woman to connect with her child with all her being.

Nowadays, from the very first weeks, modern prenatal diagnosis techniques can detect the presence of
malformations and illness that may at times seriously endanger the life of the child and the mother’s peace of mind. Even the suspicion of an illness, and especially the certainty of a disease, changes the experience of pregnancy and causes deep distress to women and couples. A sense of isolation, helplessness and concern about the eventual suffering of the child and the whole family, all this is like a silent cry, a call for help in the darkness, when faced with an illness whose outcome cannot be foreseen with certainty. Every illness takes its own course, nor can physicians can always know how it will affect each
individual.

Yet, there is one thing that medicine knows well, and that is that unborn children with pathological
conditions are little patients who can often be treated with sophisticated pharmacological, surgical and support interventions. It is now possible to reduce the frightening gap between diagnoses and therapeutic options. For years, that has been one of the reasons for elective abortion and abandonment of care at the birth of many children with serious medical conditions. Foetal therapies on the one hand, and perinatal hospices on the other, achieve surprising results in terms of clinical care, and they provide essential support to families who embrace the birth of a sick child.

These possibilities and information need to be made available to all, in order to expand a scientific and pastoral approach of competent care. For this reason, it is essential that doctors have a clear understanding not only of the aim of healing, but also of the sacredness of human life, the protection of which remains the ultimate goal of medical practice. The medical profession is a mission, a vocation to life, and it is important that doctors be aware that they themselves are a gift to the families entrusted to them. We need doctors who can establish a rapport with others, assume responsibility for other people’s lives, be proactive in dealing with pain, capable of providing reassurance, and always committed to finding solutions respectful of the dignity of each human life.

In this sense, perinatal comfort care is an approach to care that humanizes medicine, for it entails a
responsible relationship to the sick child, who is accompanied by the staff and his or her family in an integrated care process. The child is never abandoned, but is surrounded by human warmth and love.

This is particularly necessary in the case of those children who, in our current state of scientific knowledge, are destined to die immediately after birth or shortly afterwards. In these cases, treatment may seem an unnecessary use of resources and a source of further suffering for the parents. However, if we look at the situation more closely, we can perceive the real meaning behind this effort, which seeks to bring the love of a family to fulfilment. Indeed, caring for these children helps parents to process their mourning and to understand it not only as loss, but also as a stage in a journey travelled together. They will have had the opportunity to love their child, and that child will remain in their memory forever. Many times, those few hours in which a mother can cradle her child in her arms leave an unforgettable trace in her heart. And she feels, if I may use the word, realized. She feels herself a mother.

Unfortunately, the dominant culture today does not promote this approach. On a social level, fear and
hostility towards disability often lead to the choice of abortion, presenting it as a form of “prevention”. However, the Church’s teaching on this point is clear: human life is sacred and inviolable, and the use of prenatal diagnosis for selective purposes must be strongly discouraged. It is an expression of an inhumane eugenic mentality that deprives families of the chance to accept, embrace and love the weakest of their children.

Sometimes we hear people say, “You Catholics do not accept abortion; it’s a problem with your faith”.
No, the problem is pre-religious. Faith has nothing to do with it. It comes afterwards, but it has nothing to do with it. The problem is a human problem. It is pre-religious. Let’s not blame faith for something that from the beginning has nothing to do with it. The problem is a human problem. Just two questions will help us understand this clearly. Two questions. First: is it licit to eliminate a human life to solve a problem? Second: is it licit to hire a killer to resolve a problem? I leave the answer to you. This is the point. Don’t blame religion for a human issue. It is not licit. Never, never eliminate a human life or hire a killer to solve a problem.

Abortion is never the answer that women and families are looking for. Rather, it is fear of illness and isolation that makes parents waver. The practical, human and spiritual difficulties are undeniable, but it is precisely for this reason that a more incisive pastoral action is urgently needed to support those families who accept sick children. There is a need to create spaces, places and “networks of love” to which couples can turn, and to spend time assisting these families.

I think of a story that I heard of in my other Diocese. A fifteen-year-old girl with Down syndrome became pregnant and her parents went to the judge to get authorization for an abortion. The judge, a very upright man, studied the case and said “I would like to question the girl”. [The parents answered:] “But she has Down syndrome she doesn’t understand”. [The judge replied:] “No, have her come”. The young girl sat down and began to speak with the judge. He said to her: “Do you know what happened to you”. [She replied:] “Yes, I’m sick”. [The judge then asked:] “And what is your sickness?” [She answered:] “They told me that I have an animal inside me that is eating my stomach, and that is why I have to have an operation”. [The judge told her:] “No, you don’t have a worm that’s eating your stomach. You know what you have? It’s a baby”. The young girl with Down syndrome said: “Oh, how beautiful!” That’s what happened. So the judge did not authorize the abortion. The mother wanted it. The years passed; the baby was born, she went to school, she grew up and she became a lawyer. From the time that she knew her story, because they told it to her, every day on her birthday she called the judge to thank him for the gift of being born. The things that happen in life… The judge is now dead and she has become a public prosecutor. See what a beautiful thing happened! Abortion is never the response that women and families are looking for.

Thank you, then, to you who are working for all this. Thank you, in particular, families, mothers and
fathers, who have welcomed life that is frail – and I emphasize that word “frail” – for mothers, and women, are specialists in situations of frailty: welcoming frail life. And now, all of you are supporting and helping other families. Your witness of love is a gift to the world. I bless you and keep you in my prayer.  And I ask you, please, to pray for me.


Tijd voor een nieuw abortusdebat dat het gevoel overstijgt

Katholiek Nieuwsblad, 24 mei 2019

Dat ouders levenloos geboren kinderen in het bevolkingsregister kunnen laten inschrijven, zou onze kijk op de beschermwaardigheid van het leven moeten veranderen. Het debat daarover zou het niveau van het gevoel moeten overstijgen.

De 28-jarige Yara was vorige week weer in het nieuws. Zij liet onlangs haar geaborteerde kindje inschrijven in het bevolkingsregister. Dit was mogelijk door een recente wetswijziging, waardoor ouders hun levenloos geboren kinderen mogen laten inschrijven. Juristenvereniging Pro Vita vindt het een goede ontwikkeling dat de wetgever op deze manier rouwende ouders tegemoetkomt.

Troost

Uit de uitzending van NieuwLicht van maandag bleek ook hoeveel troost de inschrijving geeft aan ouders die hun kindje verloren hebben. Toch roept de inschrijving van het geaborteerde kindje van Yara ook vragen op. Want hoe denken we nu over het ongeboren menselijk leven? Welke (juridische) waarde hechten we daaraan?

Tegenstrijdigheid

De overheid heeft in elk geval geen eenduidige visie op het ongeboren leven. Want op grond van de abortuswet kunnen ongeborenen een anonieme dood sterven. Maar op grond van de nieuwe regels erkent de overheid datzelfde kindje als mens door een inschrijving in het bevolkingsregister. Hoe verenigen we deze erkenning van het mens-zijn met de anonieme dood door abortus? Wat zegt dat over onze visie op het ongeboren leven?

Nogmaals, we zijn erg blij met de nieuwe regels en dat ook vrouwen die een abortus ondergingen er gebruik van kunnen maken. Maar de tegenstrijdigheid van de twee wetten vraagt om een hernieuwd debat over de beschermwaardigheid en de rechtsbescherming van het ongeboren leven.

Gevoelskwesties?

We hopen dat met een hernieuwd debat verder wordt gekeken dan gevoel. Want hoewel gevoelens belangrijk zijn en gerespecteerd moeten worden, mogen we ethische vraagstukken niet alleen daarvan laten afhangen.

De wetgever laat nu de bewuste wetgeving – en dus de waarde van het ongeboren leven – vooral afhangen van de wensen en gevoelens van burgers, en niet van een bepaalde uitgedachte visie of ethiek. Iets dat D66-Tweede Kamerlid Vera Bergkamp ook erkende. Volgens haar waren de nieuwe regels over de inschrijving van levenloos geboren kinderen “gebaseerd op het gevoel dat ouders kunnen hebben”.

Ook de abortuswet kwam voort uit wensen van de bevolking. Maar als de overheid wetten aanneemt die alleen zijn gebaseerd op gevoel, reduceren we belangrijke ethische kwesties – waarvan mensenlevens afhangen – dan niet tot gevoelskwesties?

Evenwicht

Laten we daarom als samenleving nadenken over hoe we de meest kwetsbare mensenlevens kunnen beschermen, overigens zonder afbreuk te doen aan de bescherming van (ongewenst) zwangere vrouwen. Want met de mogelijkheid om levenloos geboren en geaborteerde baby’s in te schrijven, zit de overheid naar ons idee op het spoor van erkenning van het mens-zijn van ongeborenen.

Evaluatie van de abortuswet

Wij moedigen de overheid dan ook aan deze impliciete erkenning door te zetten naar een betere bescherming van het ongeboren leven. Dat kan bijvoorbeeld tijdens de evaluatie van de abortuswet die komend jaar plaatsvindt. Die zou als doel moeten hebben evenwicht te brengen in de bescherming van het ongeboren leven en die van de ongewenst zwangere vrouw.

Mr. Marie-Thérèse Hengst is bestuurslid van Juristenvereniging Pro Vita. Zie www.provita.nl.


Pro Vita opinie: geaborteerde kinderen in bevolkingsregister

De 28-jarige Yara was deze week in het nieuws. Zij liet haar
onlangs haar geaborteerde kindje inschrijven in het bevolkingsregister. Dit was
mogelijk door een recente wetswijziging waardoor ouders hun levenloos geboren
kinderen mogen laten inschrijven. Juristenvereniging Pro Vita (JPV) vindt het
een goede ontwikkeling dat de wetgever op deze manier rouwende ouders
tegemoetkomt. Uit de uitzending van NieuwLicht afgelopen maandag bleek ook hoe
veel troost de inschrijving geeft aan ouders die hun kindje verloren hebben.
Toch roept de inschrijving van het geaborteerde kindje van Yara ook vragen op.
Want hoe denken we nu over het ongeboren menselijk leven? Welke (juridische)
waarde hechten we daar aan?

De overheid heeft in elk geval geen eenduidige visie op het
ongeboren leven. Want op grond van de Abortuswet kunnen ongeborenen een
anonieme dood sterven. Maar op grond van de nieuwe regels erkent de overheid
datzelfde kindje als mens door een inschrijving in het bevolkingsregister. Hoe
verenigen we deze erkenning van het mens-zijn met de anonieme dood door
abortus? Wat zegt dat over onze visie op het ongeboren leven? Nogmaals, we zijn
erg blij met de nieuwe regels en dat ook vrouwen die een abortus ondergingen er
gebruik van kunnen maken. Maar de tegenstrijdigheid van de twee wetten vraagt onzes
inziens om een hernieuwd debat over de beschermwaardigheid en de
rechtsbescherming van het ongeboren leven.  

We hopen dat met een hernieuwd debat verder wordt gekeken dan gevoel. Want hoewel gevoelens belangrijk zijn en gerespecteerd moeten worden, mogen we ethische vraagstukken niet alleen daarvan laten afhangen. De wetgever laat nu de bewuste wetgeving – en dus de waarde van het ongeboren leven – vooral afhangen van de wensen en gevoelens van burgers, en niet van een bepaalde uitgedachte visie of ethiek. Iets dat D66-Tweede Kamerlid Vera Bergkamp ook erkende.  Volgens haar waren de nieuwe regels over de inschrijving van levenloos geboren kinderen “gebaseerd op het gevoel dat ouders kunnen hebben”. [1 https://nos.nl/artikel/2281277-foetus-na-abortus-ingeschreven-in-bevolkingsregister.html ] Ook de abortuswet kwam voort uit wensen van de bevolking. Maar als de overheid wetten aanneemt die alleen zijn gebaseerd op gevoel, reduceren we belangrijke ethische kwesties – waarvan mensenlevens afhangen – dan niet tot gevoelskwesties?

Laten we daarom als samenleving nadenken over hoe we de
meest kwetsbare mensenlevens kunnen beschermen, overigens zonder afbreuk te
doen aan de bescherming van (ongewenst) zwangere vrouwen. Want met de
mogelijkheid om levenloos geboren en geaborteerde baby’s in te schrijven, zit
de overheid naar ons idee op het spoor van erkenning van het mens-zijn van
ongeborenen. Wij moedigen de overheid dan ook aan deze impliciete erkenning door
te zetten naar een betere bescherming van het ongeboren leven. Dat kan
bijvoorbeeld tijdens de evaluatie van de abortuswet die komend jaar
plaatsvindt. Dit met het doel meer evenwicht te brengen in de bescherming van
het ongeboren leven en die van de ongewenst zwangere vrouw.

mr. Marie-Thérèse Hengst

Bestuurslid Juristenvereniging Pro Vita


Register levenloos geboren kind ook voor abortus

EO, 20 april 2019

De EO kondigt een documentaire aan waarin duidelijk wordt dat een geaborteerde foetus ingeschreven kan worden in het bevolkingsregister. Dit roept vanzelfsprekend de vraag op of deze foetus een menselijke persoon is en zo ja, waarom deze mens dan toch gedood mag worden. Vanuit christelijk perspectief is het duidelijk dat de foetus een menselijke persoon is en dus niet gedood mag worden: de overheid lijkt in de wet (abortuswet en de wet die de registratie in het bevolkingsregister regelt) met twee maten te meten.


Vaticaanse diplomaat bij VN: Reproductieve rechten betreffen niet abortus

Statement of H.E. Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Apostolic Nuncio, Permanent Observer of the Holy See

Fifty-Second Session of the Commission on Population and Development, Agenda Item 3(b): Review and appraisal of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and its contribution to the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

New York, 3 April 2019

Mr. Chair,

As we call to mind the 25th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo and consider the follow-up to its Program of Action in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, my Delegation is aware of the many challenges that the international community still faces to achieve the goal of greater, integral human development.

The ICPD was an important milestone in the world’s understanding of the interrelationship between population and development, indeed considering the linkage between these two for the first time. All forms of coercion in the implementation of population policies were rejected. The family, based on marriage, was recognized as the fundamental unit of society, and as entitled to comprehensive support and protection. Strong impetus was given to the improvement of the status of women throughout the world, particularly with regard to their health, and their full and equal participation in development. The expanding phenomenon of migration was considered along with its impact on development.

Since then, development has been and remains the proper context for the international community’s consideration of population issues.Within such discussions there naturally arise questions relating to the transmission and nurturing of human life. To formulate and position population issues, however, in terms of individual “sexual and reproductive rights” is to change the focus from that which should be the proper concern of governments and international agencies. Suggesting that reproductive health includes a right to abortion explicitly violates the language of the ICPD, defies moral and legal standards within domestic legislations and divides efforts to address the real needs of mothers and children, especially those yet unborn.

Moreover, questions involving the transmission of life and its subsequent nurturing cannot be adequately dealt with except in relation to the good of the family, which the Universal Declaration of Human Rights defines as “the natural and fundamental group unit of society.”[1]

Governments and society ought to promote social policies that have the family as their principal object, assisting it by providing adequate resources and efficient means of support, both for bringing up children and looking after the elderly, to strengthen relations between generations and avoid distancing the elderly from the family unit.

Mr. Chair,

Another landmark of the ICPD was the link between migration and development. Ever since, there has been increased sensitivity, research, cooperation and effective policies in this field, leading to the adoption of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. Migration is a global phenomenon; one which is linked to development and poverty, as well as to financial and health security. In particular, migrants are now seen as proactive agents of development. Nonetheless, negative stereotypes of migrants are, at times, exploited to promote policies detrimental to their rights and dignity, and migrants, especially children and women, are often victims of trafficking. These are issues that demand our attention when tackling problems concerning population and development.

This topic also has strong environmental implications. While population growth is often blamed for environmental problems, we know that the matter is much more complex. Wasteful patterns of consumption, growing inequalities, the unsustainable exploitation of natural resources, the absence of restrictions or safeguards in industries, all endanger the natural environment. Research across several decades shows, with insignificant variations, that inequalities in consumption are stark. Globally, the 20% of the world’s highest-income people account for 86% of total consumption, while the poorest 20% a mere 1.3%. Confronted with these and other data that demonstrate drastic inequalities, Pope Francis exhorts us to an “ecological conversion,”[2] which calls for a change to a more modest lifestyle and responsible consumption, and for a greater awareness of the universal destination of the world’s resources.

Mr. Chair,

The Holy See is fully aware of the complexity of the issues involved in the review and appraisal of the ICPD Programme of Action. This very complexity requires that we carefully weigh the consequences for present and future generations of the strategies and recommendations to be proposed. Fundamental questions like the transmission of life, the family, and the material and moral development of society, need very serious consideration. The Holy See stands ready to make its contribution toward finding ways to building a world of genuine equality, fraternity and peace.

Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Notes

  1. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 16.3.
  2. Pope Francis, Encyclical Letter Laudato Si’, 216.

Vaticaanse diplomaat keurt doden van ongeboren kinderen met Down syndroom af

Social Protections For Women, Girls And All Those With Down Syndrome

Statement by H.E. Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Apostolic Nuncio, Permanent Observer of the Holy See
At the Side Event entitled “Social Protections for Women, Girls and All Those with Down Syndrome” United Nations, New York, 21 March 2019

Your Excellencies, Distinguished Panelists, Dear Friends,

I am very happy to welcome you to this morning’s event on social protections for women, girls and all those with Down Syndrome, which the Holy See is pleased to be sponsoring, on this International Down Syndrome Awareness Day, with the Center for Family and Human Rights.

During the 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women that has been taking place over the last ten days, we have been focused on the theme of social protections, access to public services and sustainable infrastructure to achieve gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls. We have considered the gaps in these protections and the various vulnerabilities to which women and girls are exposed. We have examined the situation of access in places across the globe to services like education, work, health care, and infrastructure like housing, energy, water and sanitation, and have looked at the discrimination that is often at the root of why people are deprived of them.

But what is a situation of concern for all women across the globe is particularly acute for women and girls with Down Syndrome, as well as parents of Down Syndrome children. And if there is one area in which there does not seem to be much of a variance between girls and boys it is with regard to what happens when parents receive a diagnosis of Down Syndrome. In many countries that diagnosis is sadly tantamount to a death sentence. Despite the assurances of the 2006 Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to “promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities,” including “those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments,” and to “promote respect for their inherent dignity,” there are really no social protections for those diagnosed in the womb with a third 21st chromosome. For children born with Down Syndrome, in many places access to public services — to education, work, adequate health care — is inadequate or non existent. And in places with lagging infrastructure, the difficulties for those with Down Syndrome and their families can be exacerbated. Their special needs are often largely overlooked, including by an international community that is committed to leaving no one behind and ensuring the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights of persons with disabilities.

Back in 2011, the UN General Assembly made a commitment to ensure that those with Down Syndrome would not be left behind. With Resolution 66/149, it declared March 21 as World Down Syndrome Day and invited all Member States, relevant organizations of the United Nations system, other international organizations, and civil society to observe it annually in order to raise public awareness throughout society, including at the family level, regarding persons with Down Syndrome. March 21 (or in numerals 3-21 for Trisomy-21) had previously been marked from 2006 as World Down Syndrome Day by advocacy and research groups.

On the first observance of World Down Syndrome Day at the United Nations seven years ago today, then Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said, “Let us reaffirm that persons with Down syndrome are entitled to the full and effective enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms. Let us each do our part to enable children and persons with Down Syndrome to participate fully in the development and life of their societies on an equal basis with others. Let us build an inclusive society for all.”

But it’s a struggle to build that inclusive society. In 2017, a major US television network reported that one country was on the verge of eliminating Down Syndrome, but what it really meant was that it was eliminating those with Down Syndrome, because practically 100 percent of parents of babies who receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down Syndrome were choosing to end the life of their son or daughter. Several other countries have similar statistics, to such a degree that many defenders of the rights of those with Down Syndrome, and other objective observers, call what is happening to children diagnosed with Trisomy 21 in the womb a “genocide.”

Even some within the UN System, despite the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, despite the stated commitment of the UN General Assembly, are abetting that genocide. In November 2017, one of the members of the United Nations Human Rights Committee, based in Geneva, stated during an official meeting, “If you tell a woman, ‘Your child has … Down Syndrome … or that he may have a handicap forever, for the rest of his life,’ … it should be possible for her to resort to abortion to avoid the handicap as a preventive measure.” Defending those with disabilities, he said, “does not mean that we have to accept to let a disabled fetus live.” Such a position is baldly inconsistent with the UN’s concern to leave no one behind and to defend the rights of those with disabilities. As Dr. Jerome Lejeune, who discovered the cause of Down Syndrome in 1958, once said, after what he had discovered was being against rather than in favor of those with Down Syndrome, “Medicine becomes mad science when it attacks the patient instead of fighting the disease.” He underlined, rather, that “we must always be on the patient’s side,” and that the practice of medicine must always be to “hate the disease [and] love the patient.”

Pope Francis said in 2017 that the response to the eugenic trend of ending the lives of the unborn who show some form of imperfection is, in short, love. “The answer,” he said, “is love: not that false, saccharine and sanctimonious love, but that which is true, concrete and respectful. To the extent that one is accepted and loved, included in the community and supported in looking to the future with confidence, the true path of life evolves and one experiences enduring happiness.”

And the happiness of those with Down Syndrome, and the happiness they bring to others, cannot be denied. A 2011 Study published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics by Harvard University Researchers associated with Boston Children’s Hospital showed that 99 percent of those with Down Syndrome say they are happy with their lives, 97 percent like who they are, 96 percent like how they look, 99 percent of them love their families, 97 percent like their siblings and 86 percent said they make friends easily. It also showed that 99 percent of their parents said they love their child with Down Syndrome, and 79 percent said that their outlook on life is more positive because of their child. And among siblings 12 and older, the survey indicated that 94 percent said they are proud to have a brother or sister with Down Syndrome, and 88 percent said they are better people because of him or her.

I cannot think of any other situation that would show such high numbers among children with a particular condition or no condition at all, and among their parents, and siblings. We could even say that Down Children and their families are simply among the happiest groups of people alive — and the world is happier because of them.

We’ll have a chance today to hear from our panel — Karen Gaffney, Michelle Sie Whitten, Deanna Smith and Rick Smith — where this infectious happiness comes from.

I thank you for your attendance today and for your interest in providing social protections and access to public services — indeed full and effective enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms — for all those with Down Syndrome, and for working not only to build a society that includes them, but cherishes them, and benefits from their presence and many gifts.


Keuzevrijheid voor huisartsen bepleit rond abortuspil

Medisch Contact, 18 februari 2019

Huisartsen moeten zelf kunnen beslissen of zij abortuspillen aan patiënten verstrekken. Dat stellen de Landelijke Huisartsen Vereniging (LHV) en het Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap (NHG) in reactie op een wetsvoorstel om huisartsen meer mogelijkheden rond abortus te geven. 


Jaarraport IGJ: Meer abortussen om afwijking kind

Katholiek Nieuwsblad, 8 februari 2019

Het aantal abortussen wegens mogelijke afwijkingen bij het ongeboren kind is in 2017 toegenomen tot 1152. In 2016 waren dat er nog 1011. Dat blijkt uit de laatste cijfers van de Inspectie Gezondheidszorg en Jeugd (IGJ). Ook neemt het aantal abortussen per duizend levendgeborenen langzaam toe.

Sinds 2011 wordt bijgehouden of prenatale diagnostiek invloed heeft gehad op de keuze van abortus. Dat was in 2017 vaker het geval dan in 2016. Vrouwen krijgen vanaf 2007 de 20 wekenecho en sinds 2017 de NIPT aangeboden.

Reden registreren

In een reactie van de Nederlandse Patiënten Vereniging (NPV) pleit directeur Diederik van Dijk dat ook geregistreerd zou moeten worden waarom ouders kiezen voor abortus. “Gaat het om het syndroom van Down, een open rug, een hartafwijking? Zeker nu sprake is van een toename, is registratie van  levensbelang. Aan de hand van die informatie kan counseling en hulpverlening verbeterd worden.”

Screening uitgebreid

Hij wijst erop dat de 20-wekenecho die sinds 2007 is ingevoerd bedoeld was om te screenen op zogeheten neurale buisdefecten. De bekendste vorm daarvan is wat een ‘open rug’ wordt genoemd. In de praktijk is de echo uitgegroeid tot een veel breder onderzoek naar afwijkingen, aldus de NPV. Het aantal zwangerschappen die worden afgebroken tussen de 20e en 24e week van de zwangerschap is sinds de invoering van deze echo gestegen. De NIPT is ingevoerd om te screening op trisomie 13, 18 en 21. Er zijn echter steeds meer ziekten op te sporen met DNA-tests tijdens de zwangerschap.

Alleen bij verhoogd risico

Van Dijk vindt daarom dat “prenataal onderzoek niet aangeboden zou moeten worden aan vrouwen en ongeboren baby’s die in beginsel geen gezondheidsproblemen hebben. Dat zou gereserveerd moeten blijven voor vrouwen met een verhoogd risico en op een passend moment in de zwangerschap aangeboden moeten worden – waarbij niet de abortusgrens, maar goede ondersteuning, begeleiding en (soms) behandeling leidend moeten zijn.”

Jaarlijks 30.500 abortussen

Het aantal abortussen in Nederland ligt sinds 2011 gemiddeld op 30.500. De tien jaar daaraan voorafgaand was er een lichte daling van 33.335 in 2000 tot de stabilisatie in 2011.

Sinds 1990 is het abortuscijfer gestegen, maar na 2001 gestabiliseerd op 8,6. Het abortuscijfer geeft het aantal zwangerschapsafbrekingen aan per duizend vrouwen in de vruchtbare leeftijd (15 tot 45 jaar). Ook in 2017 was het abortuscijfer 8,6.

De abortusratio, het aantal zwangerschapsafbrekingen per duizend levendgeborenen schuift echter gestaag omhoog, van 146 in 2002 tot 159 in 2017. In 1990 was dat nog 93.

Tienerzwangerschappen

Hoewel het aantal tienerzwangerschappen blijft geleidelijk dalen, blijft het aantal afgebroken zwangerschappen relatief gelijk: twee van de drie zwangerschappen bij meisjes jonger dan twintig jaar eindigt in abortus. (KN)

Overgenomen met toestemming van Katholiek Nieuwsblad.


Inspectie Gezondheidszorg en Jeugd: stijging aantal abortussen in 2017

In 2017 werden in Nederland 30.523 zwangerschapsafbrekingen uitgevoerd. Dat zijn er iets meer dan in 2016. De meeste zwangerschapsafbrekingen gebeuren in de eerste 7 weken.

3.482 behandelingen (11 procent) werden uitgevoerd bij vrouwen die in het buitenland wonen en hiervoor naar Nederland kwamen. Dat blijkt uit het jaarlijkse rapport van de Inspectie Gezondheidszorg en Jeugd over de Wet afbreking zwangerschap.

Sinds 2002 daalt het aantal zwangerschapsafbrekingen bij tieners; dit was ook in 2017 het geval . De meeste zwangerschapsafbrekingen vonden plaats bij vrouwen in de leeftijdcategorie 25 tot 30 jaar.

Aantallen abortus t/m 2017